This is Whitechapel

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In 1972 The Whitechapel Gallery comissioned Ian Berry to capture the changes occurring on the streets on the doorstep of the gallery. “I had just returned to London after a few years working as a Magnum photographer out of their office in Paris,” he recalls. “I had come back with a fresh eye and was just starting a new project when I got the call. It was too good an opportunity to turn down.”

“It was a different time and people were still not used to the notion of street photography. I just walked into schools with my camera, which you could certainly not do now. At the local hospital, they gave me a white coat, told me not to get in the way of the doctors, and just left me to get on with it. You had a freedom then that photographers no longer have.”

Berry remembers “a certain palpable feeling of sadness that was in the air, the sense that one wave of immigrants were being supplanted by another. It was just becoming a multi-racial, but mainly Asian community, and the old Jewish community was in terminal decline. You could sense the sadness on their faces, in their demeanour. That’s what I remember most.”

When speaking of one of the photographs above, picturing two woman in the road, both with their mouthes open, Berry said, “It’s not my favourite photograph and it did not make it into the original show,” says Berry, who, back then, worked mainly in colour and often for the fledgling Observer magazine. “The ladies make a great shape but it just misses being great because of that white car. Had I printed it myself, which I didn’t have time to, I would have darkened that bloody car.”

This chance element remains in all the images, ensuring their honesty and making them great examples of early street photography. The exhibition also shows these photographs at a time when East London is again changing due to the 2012 Olympics, demonstrating the ever evolving face of the capital.

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Street Fighting Man. 50 Years of Youth Protest

28th April – 4th June 2011

The exhibition demonstrates the power of rock and roll as a focus for rebellion, and the status of rock singers as mouthpieces for radicalism.  To compliment this, the exhibition also traces a wider sociological context of street protests that include CND marches, civil unrest in Ireland, inner city riots, the Poll tax riots. The exhibition coincides with a new wave of national demonstrations involving both Union activism and student protest, against Government economic policy, scheduled for 26 March 2011.

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FUTURE EXHIBITION – Street Fighting Man. 50 Years of Youth Protest

28th April – 4th June 2011
Ev’rywhere I hear the sound of marching, charging feet, boy

‘Cause summer’s here and the time is right for fighting in the street, boy…

Hey! Said my name is called disturbance
I’ll shout and scream, I’ll kill the king, I’ll rail at all his servants…

(The Rolling Stones, Street Fighting Man, 1968)

This exhibition takes as its starting point, 1968, the year of rising violence on the streets of Paris and rallies in London. In March 1968 Mick Jagger attended an anti-War demonstration outside London’s U.S. embassy, during which mounted police attempted to control a crowd of 25,000, and this along with the rising violence in Paris encouraged him to write The Rolling Stones most political song, Street Fighting Man.

The Sixties was not just a period of permissiveness filled with new music, fashion and art, it was a decade too of activism, of protests and demonstrations, aimed at overthrowing old prejudices, promoting a new liberalism and championing pacifism. The legacy of this activism can still be felt today.

The exhibition demonstrates the power of rock and roll as a focus for rebellion, and the status of rock singers as mouthpieces for radicalism. The exhibition includes a remarkable extended series of photographs charting a riot at a Rolling Stones concert as well as Caroline Coon’s celebrated photographs of Punks including The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Slits, The Buzzcocks. Through such series, the exhibition gives as much prominence to the crowd as much as the musicians in order to foreground the wider impact of this music.

To compliment this, the exhibition also traces a wider sociological context of street protests that include CND marches, civil unrest in Ireland, inner city riots, the Poll tax riots. The exhibition coincides with a new wave of national demonstrations involving both Union activism and student protest, against Government economic policy, scheduled for 26 March 2011.

Please contact Flash Projects or Margaret London PR to receive the latest announcements or an exhibition press release.

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Dystopian Dreams. Kubrick’s Legacy Lives On

John ALCOTT A Clockwork Orange, Malcolm McDowell Gelatin Silver Print 15 x 25 cms (5.90 x 9.83 ins) 1971

Famous for ‘A Clockwork Orange’ and ‘Dr. Strangelove’, Kubrick’s legacy lives on in this selection of vintage film set photographs. Kubrick’s films are characterised by a formal visual style and meticulous attention to detail. His later films often have elements of surrealism and expressionism that eschews structured linear narrative. They are repeatedly described as slow and methodical, and are often perceived as a reflection of his obsessive and perfectionist nature. A recurring theme in his films is man’s inhumanity to man. While often viewed as expressing an ironic pessimism, a few critics feel his films contain a cautious optimism when viewed more carefully.

Photographer John Alcott was an award-winning set director on A Clockwork Orange. The film takes place in futuristic Britain, where characters experiment with forms of psychological perversion and extreme violence. The film is visually Surreal, and the plot even more dream-like in its exploration of freedom and control.

Boats and Long Lenses. Bardot in St. Tropez

In these photographs, Bardot is pictured in St. Tropez. The once-sleepy French fishing village is where she spent most of her time when she was not shooting, preferring it over popular nearby Monte Carlo. St. Tropez would not remain quiet for long however and Bardot is often credited with putting St. Tropez on the map for the international glitterati.

In these photographs, Bardot is pictured in St. Tropez. The once-sleepy French fishing village is where she spent most of her time when she was not shooting, preferring it over popular nearby Monte Carlo. St. Tropez would not remain quiet for long however and Bardot is often credited with putting St. Tropez on the map for the international glitterati.

The shots here are taken with a telephoto lens and the subjects appear to be unaware of being photographed. This style of photograph marks a departure away from the more intimate and candid early paparazzi shots, in which photographer and subjects shared the same territory. Gone is the collusion and the game of cat and mouse of the early street photographers. The new generation of paparazzi photographer was much more akin to the realm of surveillance photography than street photography.

There are two possible reasons for this shift. Firstly, in the wake of John Lennon’s death, celebrity security was heavily tightened, and access to celebrities severely curtailed. Secondly, the creation of the role of publicist put new limits on what could and could not be published.

As a result, in these images, content rules over form. Little attention is paid to framing or composition, the main focus being on capturing the target. These images mark the end of an era and usher in the type of paparazzi image we are more familiar with today.

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