Street Fighting Man. 50 Years of Youth Protest

28th April – 4th June 2011

The exhibition demonstrates the power of rock and roll as a focus for rebellion, and the status of rock singers as mouthpieces for radicalism.  To compliment this, the exhibition also traces a wider sociological context of street protests that include CND marches, civil unrest in Ireland, inner city riots, the Poll tax riots. The exhibition coincides with a new wave of national demonstrations involving both Union activism and student protest, against Government economic policy, scheduled for 26 March 2011.

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FUTURE EXHIBITION – Street Fighting Man. 50 Years of Youth Protest

28th April – 4th June 2011
Ev’rywhere I hear the sound of marching, charging feet, boy

‘Cause summer’s here and the time is right for fighting in the street, boy…

Hey! Said my name is called disturbance
I’ll shout and scream, I’ll kill the king, I’ll rail at all his servants…

(The Rolling Stones, Street Fighting Man, 1968)

This exhibition takes as its starting point, 1968, the year of rising violence on the streets of Paris and rallies in London. In March 1968 Mick Jagger attended an anti-War demonstration outside London’s U.S. embassy, during which mounted police attempted to control a crowd of 25,000, and this along with the rising violence in Paris encouraged him to write The Rolling Stones most political song, Street Fighting Man.

The Sixties was not just a period of permissiveness filled with new music, fashion and art, it was a decade too of activism, of protests and demonstrations, aimed at overthrowing old prejudices, promoting a new liberalism and championing pacifism. The legacy of this activism can still be felt today.

The exhibition demonstrates the power of rock and roll as a focus for rebellion, and the status of rock singers as mouthpieces for radicalism. The exhibition includes a remarkable extended series of photographs charting a riot at a Rolling Stones concert as well as Caroline Coon’s celebrated photographs of Punks including The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Slits, The Buzzcocks. Through such series, the exhibition gives as much prominence to the crowd as much as the musicians in order to foreground the wider impact of this music.

To compliment this, the exhibition also traces a wider sociological context of street protests that include CND marches, civil unrest in Ireland, inner city riots, the Poll tax riots. The exhibition coincides with a new wave of national demonstrations involving both Union activism and student protest, against Government economic policy, scheduled for 26 March 2011.

Please contact Flash Projects or Margaret London PR to receive the latest announcements or an exhibition press release.

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Dystopian Dreams. Kubrick’s Legacy Lives On

John ALCOTT A Clockwork Orange, Malcolm McDowell Gelatin Silver Print 15 x 25 cms (5.90 x 9.83 ins) 1971

Famous for ‘A Clockwork Orange’ and ‘Dr. Strangelove’, Kubrick’s legacy lives on in this selection of vintage film set photographs. Kubrick’s films are characterised by a formal visual style and meticulous attention to detail. His later films often have elements of surrealism and expressionism that eschews structured linear narrative. They are repeatedly described as slow and methodical, and are often perceived as a reflection of his obsessive and perfectionist nature. A recurring theme in his films is man’s inhumanity to man. While often viewed as expressing an ironic pessimism, a few critics feel his films contain a cautious optimism when viewed more carefully.

Photographer John Alcott was an award-winning set director on A Clockwork Orange. The film takes place in futuristic Britain, where characters experiment with forms of psychological perversion and extreme violence. The film is visually Surreal, and the plot even more dream-like in its exploration of freedom and control.